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Getting Bored

Updated | Posted

Has 9 years experience.

do-you-get-bored-restless-with-job-what-do-you-do.jpg.7d8afd6b445672ce67a8a1b80e79ba50.jpg

I'm not sure if I am having a mid life crisis or what.?

Did you ever get bored in your current job? Bored isn't really the right word because I don't really think you can ever get bored in nursing, but I guess I just feel restless??Like looking for deeper meaning, what do I want to do for the rest of my life, is this it?, blah blah. I just want something else. But I have no? idea what that something really is. Not necessarily out of nursing, but new niche? I've only been at this job 4.5 years!?

Ever feel this way? What did you do? Did you make a switch at that point? Just try something else out for a while, random job applications to different specialties??How did it work out??

Davey Do

Specializes in around 25 years psych, 10 years medical. Has 42 years experience.

If we get into a routine and know what to expect, do basically the same redundant chores on a regular basis, we can become complacent, Curious.

We often confuse feeling bored as actually being comfortable, for can we be?stressed and bored at the same time??Feeling bored can be good, for the state can motivate us to broaden our horizons and seek out new pastures in which to graze.

27 minutes ago, Curious1alwys said:

Ever feel this way? What did you do? Did you make a switch at that point? Just try something else out for a while, random job applications to different specialties??How did it work out??

I have felt this way, and I allowed myself to revel in not having to deal with stress and having the time to lowly listen and follow The Fates.

Lowly listening is a concept that I learned from Ralph Waldo:

“There is a guidance for each of us, and by?lowly listening?we shall hear the right word. Place yourself in the middle of the stream of power and wisdom which flows into your life. Then, without effort, you are impelled to truth and perfect contentment. “

Good luck, Curious, in your endeavor to hear the right?word!

TheMoonisMyLantern, ADN, LPN, RN

Specializes in Mental health, substance abuse, geriatrics, PCU. Has 14 years experience.

Yes, I've been in this situation a few times where I get restless and disinterested in where I'm at. Unfortunately, I haven't made wise decision in? the past when I'm feeling that way so I don't have any advice on how you should proceed.?

But just know, you're not the only one!

Davey Do

Specializes in around 25 years psych, 10 years medical. Has 42 years experience.

1 minute ago, TheMoonisMyLantern said:

Yes, I've been in this situation a few times where I get restless and disinterested in where I'm at.

Getting restless is a feeling rising up from the depths of our Primal Pools, Moon.

We are , basically, animals, always on the prowl to meet our basic physiological needs and fulfill the next level of safety and security. We always need to be on the lookout for predators and listening for that mountain lion scratching its claws upon the rocks. Hence, we are restlessly vigilant.

Our restlessness is also our bodies telling us to, "Do something!" Fortunately, my restlessness in my older age is a good motivator telling me, "Go exercise! Go workout !"

When I get restless during the day, I use that energy and sublimate it into art, exercise. or mischievous endeavors.

My medical nurse wife Belinda has to deal with me when I get mischievous.?

Poor thing.

TheMoonisMyLantern, ADN, LPN, RN

Specializes in Mental health, substance abuse, geriatrics, PCU. Has 14 years experience.

Just now, Davey Do said:

Getting restless is a feeling rising up from the depths of our Primal Pools, Moon.

We are , basically, animals, always on the prowl to meet our basic physiological needs and fulfill the next level of safety and security. We always need to be on the lookout for predators and listening for that mountain lion scratching its claws upon the rocks. Hence, we are restlessly vigilant.

Our restlessness is also our bodies telling us to, "Do something!" Fortunately, my restlessness in my older age is a good motivator telling me, "Go exercise! Go workout !"

When I get restless during the day, I use that energy and sublimate it into art, exercise. or mischievous endeavors.

My medical nurse wife Belinda has to deal with me when I get mischievous.?

Poor thing.

Very wise insight, Davey. This is why you can't leave allnurses, your wisdom is definitely needed.

Davey Do

Specializes in around 25 years psych, 10 years medical. Has 42 years experience.

1 minute ago, TheMoonisMyLantern said:

Very wise insight, Davey. This is why you can't leave allnurses, your wisdom is definitely needed.

Thank you and bless your heart, Moon.

So, I should stay because my wisdom is needed, right?

But I should go when I become too big of a wise ***?

TheMoonisMyLantern, ADN, LPN, RN

Specializes in Mental health, substance abuse, geriatrics, PCU. Has 14 years experience.

Not at all, that's just icing on the cake.

Davey Do

Specializes in around 25 years psych, 10 years medical. Has 42 years experience.

On 2/5/2021 at 9:28 AM, TheMoonisMyLantern said:

Not at all, that's just icing on the cake.

Well then: Let's use that icing on the cake to give?Curious a sugar rush!

I applaud Curious'?act of reaching out in order to gather data in?the second step of a problem-solving process. We all seek to identify and you, Moon, allowed Curious to know the feeling is not uncommon. My advice was to utilize this non-stressful time to be open to "the middle of the stream of power and wisdom which flows into your life".

I fear we may bore Curious even more so and others with this?non-dramatic thread, so let's spice things up a bit:

Hey Curious! Can I have your permission to post a cartoon in your thread which pertains to the subject of boredom?!

JBMmom, MSN

Specializes in Long term care; med-surg; critical care. Has 9 years experience.

I think you hit the nail on the head with your discernment of boredom vs curiosity. When my kids tell me they're bored I usually respond that boredom is a function of the person, not their environment. I have had some new nurse coworkers in critical care say they're "bored". They usually regret saying that to me because then I will ask them for all the details about their patient's consults, labs, results, etc. Unless they know *everything* about the patients they are caring for, there's no room for boredom.

But, you have already identified that there is always something to learn, so you're not feeling boredom in the small sense, your restlessness is potentially related to the familiarity of your environment. If you're no longer interested in delving into the small details in your current position, maybe you are ready to move on to new challenges. In my 20+ years of work, I have ended up changing jobs about every 4-5 years, and they were all natural progressions, so I understand your feelings. Good luck deciding where you next adventures take you! (or deciding to stay where you are and maybe look for something outside of nursing as your new interest)

NightNerd, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-surg/tele. Has 7 years experience.

5 hours ago, TheMoonisMyLantern said:

Yes, I've been in this situation a few times where I get restless and disinterested in where I'm at. Unfortunately, I haven't made wise decision in? the past when I'm feeling that way so I don't have any advice on how you should proceed.?

But just know, you're not the only one!

TheMoonIsMyLantern took the words right out of my mouth! For me, that restlessness feels like desperation, and I learned the hard way to NEVER make decisions based on desperation. A year and a half ago, I was so eager to get out of a work environment that wasn't healthy for me anymore, that I didn't look before I leaped. That decision has caused me more?headaches and regret than I thought possible since that time, and I still haven't quite regained my equilibrium. It sucks.

My hard-won advice on the matter is: there's nothing wrong with being curious or wanting to move on; this is part of how we grow.?Instead of focusing on what you're desperate to move away from, wait until you find something you are excited to move toward. Not just grasping at straws, convincing yourself to try it because you might like it, but something that actual piques your interest and fits into your life, skills, and goals. When that option arrives, it brings calm with it - anything else will feel frantic and hurried.

Definitely do your research, shadow whenever possible, try something different PRN, even volunteer in another environment you're considering. Gain some exposure to what you think might be a good next direction, and go into it with your eyes open, rather than just choosing something that sounds better than the current situation.

msesay91, BSN

Specializes in ICU. Has 2 years experience.

I literally had this experience last month while on my current travel assignment. I was like "can I do what I'm doing for the next 10 years?" And my answer was no (And Im only two years into nursing) So I enrolled to get my Informatics degree to branch off into IT.?

speedynurse, ADN, RN, EMT-P

Specializes in ER, Pre-Op, PACU.

On 2/5/2021 at 3:58 PM, NightNerd said:

TheMoonIsMyLantern took the words right out of my mouth! For me, that restlessness feels like desperation, and I learned the hard way to NEVER make decisions based on desperation. A year and a half ago, I was so eager to get out of a work environment that wasn't healthy for me anymore, that I didn't look before I leaped. That decision has caused me more?headaches and regret than I thought possible since that time, and I still haven't quite regained my equilibrium. It sucks.

Wow so I am not the only one! I went once from the “fire to the frying pan” in a job.....in my hurry to get out of a job I was exhausted in, I didn’t think things through and went into a job that was about a thousand times worse. I am in a much better job now, but am still trying to get my confidence back from that too fast decision.

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