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Stacy Winters MSN, APRN, NP

M.Ed MSN CRNP

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Stacy Winters has 11 years experience as a MSN, APRN, NP.

Stacy Winters's Latest Activity

  1. Stacy Winters

    Why Black History is Important in Nursing Education

    I’m here. Unfortunately my father died. I appreciate the discussion and pleased that this article generated discussion. We must be able to discuss race and history without attacking one another. Communication requires listening and reflection. I do hope we can continue to share discussions on race, class, lgbtq, elderly and how we interact with people different from who we are. We are all learning. Listening is key.
  2. Stacy Winters

    Why Black History is Important in Nursing Education

    Yes. The discussion begins with us.
  3. Stacy Winters

    Why Black History is Important in Nursing Education

    The United States government categorizes people on every form. Nursing did not create the categories. Here we are in 2021 trying to correct inequalities. The commentary I wrote was designed to shed light on inequality and provide the reader context as to why health disparities persists in the US today. I did not go into the social determinants of health and historical policies designed to keep people of color from having equal access to public education, housing and healthcare but we must remember that such policies also played and play a part in disparities today.
  4. Stacy Winters

    Why Black History is Important in Nursing Education

    Thank you for your comment. My commentary is not political. It is a historic account. It basically provides the reader insight into atrocities that have occurred in the US and how that information can explain why some Black Americans may be afraid of the Covid-19 vaccine. You are correct. There are many atrocious incidents throughout history against Indigenous persons, LGBTQ, Latinx, etc. I agree their stories should be included in nursing education as well. This was written to broaden the discussion and explain why nursing education should include more voices because we live in a diverse county. Diversity is not political. I respect your post but I disagree with you that this is a political post. I do hope more stories will be included in nursing education. It is up to us to share what was NOT in the books with others.
  5. Stacy Winters

    Why Black History is Important in Nursing Education

    Thank you so much
  6. (Image: 1920, Library of Congress, Negro Red Cross Canteen, Meridian, Mississippi) Forty-five years ago, President Gerald Ford declared February as Black History Month to recognize the many accomplishments of prominent Black Americans throughout history. Black History Month also highlights the experiences of African Americans from 1619 when the first African slaves arrived in the United States to the present day. In nursing, we traditionally celebrate the memory and work of well-known African American nurses like, Sojourner Truth and Harriet Tubman, but fail to acknowledge racism and the atrocities imposed upon the bodies of Black Americans for the sake of science. Black history is American history. It is nursing history. Nursing educational programs not only create and shape nursing practice, but thought. Interweaving Black history into the nursing curricula is the first step in decolonizing nursing curricula and reducing implicit bias in healthcare today. As nurses, we must be aware that patients are people first with unique experiences, backgrounds and history. It is more important now than ever that nurses understand the history of African Americans, their relationship with the medical community, and why some African Americans still fear going to hospitals or getting vaccines. The fear is real. It is Iatrophobia or the fear of a medical examination, harm, exploitation and/or mistreatment. Perhaps some historical accounts can shed some light as to why some African Americans avoid the healthcare system. From 1619 to 1730, African American slaves were treated as property, receiving little to no medical treatment. In the mid-1800s, James Marion Simms performed gynecological techniques on Black women without anesthesia or their consent in order to perfect his surgical techniques and to get published in medical journals. In 1913, sterilization laws were enforced. Anyone declared to have a mental illness could be sterilized. African Americans were four times more likely to be sterilized than their white counterparts. In 1932, the United States Public Health Service performed a study on sharecroppers in Tuskegee, Alabama to understand the effects of syphilis on Black men without their consent. This experiment known as the Tuskegee Experiment lasted for 40 years. The men remained untreated even though there was treatment available. The treatment was penicillin. These are only a few accounts of systemic racism in healthcare throughout history. Time cannot erase the indelible effects of medical apartheid. Mistrust persists today even as we battle Covid-19. Currently, reports show that rates of Covid-19 are three times higher among African Americans, yet many refuse to get vaccinated for the virus. According to the Pew Research Center, only 42% of African Americans state that they would get the vaccine compared to 61% of Whites. History provides insight into why some African Americans mistrust healthcare. Can we blame their skepticism? Perhaps not. The vestiges of medical racism stain the memories of many African Americans for generations. As frontline workers and trusted professionals, it is key that nurses be aware of the sorted history of medicine and the African American community. Contextualizing culture creates compassion. Understanding history is the first step in that process. References Bennett, C., Hamilton, E. K., & Rochani, H. (2019). Exploring race in nursing: Teaching nursing students about racial inequality using the historical lens. OJIN Online J Issues Nurs, 24(2). Funk, C. & Tyson, A. (3 December 2020). Intent to Get a COVID-19 Vaccine Rises to 60% as Confidence in Research and Development Process Increases. https://www.pewresearch.org/science/2020/12/03/intent-to-get-a-covid-19-vaccine-rises-to-60-as-confidence-in-research-and-development-process-increases/ Hollander, M. A., & Greene, M. G. (2019). A conceptual framework for understanding iatrophobia. Patient education and counseling, 102(11), 2091-2096. Joyner, T. & Lee, J. S. (20 April 2020). Health and race disparities in America have deep roots: A brief timeline. https://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/2020/04/20/timeline-health-race-disparities/5145641002/ Minority Nurse. (2017). Reflecting on Black History Month and Nursing. https://minoritynurse.com/reflecting-on-black-history-month-and-nursing/ Washington, H. A. (2006). Medical apartheid: the dark history of medical experimentation on Black Americans from colonial times to the present. New York: Doubleday.
  7. Stacy Winters

    Racism and Covid-19: The Unmasking of Two Pandemics

    Thank you for reading. Always know you are not alone. Stacy
  8. Stacy Winters

    Racism and Covid-19: The Unmasking of Two Pandemics

    I respect your opinion, but it is not based on facts. You have the right to your opinion. Facts are there are many equally qualified people and institutions chose on a myriad of factors. I laid out many based on the BLS data. This information is well known.
  9. Stacy Winters

    Racism and Covid-19: The Unmasking of Two Pandemics

    Yes. I am aware of that. I am sorry that happens. It should not especially when so many OB/GYNs doctors are male. I support males in nursing 100%.
  10. Stacy Winters

    Racism and Covid-19: The Unmasking of Two Pandemics

    Thank you for your reply. I respect your opinion, but I also want to offer some data. In nursing, men benefit from affirmative action because there are so few in nursing. Affirmative action does NOT mean that someone who is not qualified and be considered for a position get a position. It simply means that those who have NOT been considered for position BE considered. As a male nurse, you are rare. What does this mean for admissions committees? They MUST consider men as candidates even when they have women who are just as qualified. So chances are YOU benefit from affirmative action. Traditionally, nursing has been a White female profession. Some of this is due mostly due to segregation in education during Jim Crowe and through the Civil Rights era. Today, as you read in my article, there still a small group of of non White nurses and male nurses in the workforce. It is key that nursing consider everyone in the "melting pot." Clarification. What group benefits from affirmative action the most in industry? White Women. Yes, White women benefit the most in business, technology, medicine etc. Preferential treatment is not uncommon. It occurs with Veteran status, Native Americans, wealthy students whose parents make donations, athletes, etc. What affirmative action does is level the playing field. I looks at its industry and asks " who is NOT as the table?" Then looks at all the applicants who are qualified and says, yes we need to consider voices who have not been traditionally part of the conversation. That means--Men in Nursing. African American women and men in leadership in nursing. LGBTQ persons in nursing, etc. Each group and/or individual has something of value to add to the industry. If those voices are routinely shut out then the discussion never changes. BTW. I have worked with some amazing male nurses. It is great to see more entering nursing indeed.
  11. Hi Stacy! I loved your article regarding racism and COVID-19. I completely agree.?

    I recently moved from California to teach?at UAB in Birmingham, Al, and I have a PNP student in Maryland who is trying to find clinical hours with a nurse practitioner. Do you by chance see pediatric patients or precept students? Thanks so much for your time!?

    1. Stacy Winters

      Stacy Winters, MSN, APRN, NP

      Hi.?

      Thank you for responding.? I am an adult-gerontology nurse practitioner. I precept nursing students.? I don't precept for pediatrics.?

      I wish you much success.?

      Stacy

    2. kttyliz

      kttyliz

      Thank you so much for your quick reply! Again, amazing article and I am so glad you are speaking out for equality and reminding nurses of the inequalities that currently exist.?

  12. Stacy Winters

    Racism and Covid-19: The Unmasking of Two Pandemics

    Thank you for your reply. If you want to speak about racism in healthcare or nursing, please feel free to post on that. The United States has a long history on healthcare disparities. I made reference to public health concerns as drivers and indicators contributors to healthcare disparities. The emphasis is on how it impacts health. I am happy to speak to your about healthcare, nursing and racism. Thank you for taking a moment to read. I appreciate that.
  13. Stacy Winters

    Racism and Covid-19: The Unmasking of Two Pandemics

    Disproportionality is key. Consider these facts. Sadly, the trend of fatal police shootings in the United States seems to only be increasing, with a total 429 civilians having been shot, 88 of whom were Black, as of June 4, 2020. In 2018, there were 996 fatal police shootings, and in 2019 this figure increased to 1,004. Additionally, the rate of fatal police shootings among Black Americans was much higher than that for any other ethnicity, standing at 30 fatal shootings per million of the population as of June 2020. In 2019 data of all police killings in the country compiled by Mapping Police Violence, black Americans were nearly three times more likely to die from police than white Americans. Other statistics showed that black Americans were nearly one-and-a-half times more likely to be unarmed before their death. Most states’ police forces killed black people at a higher rate per capita than white people, with Illinois, New York and Washington D.C. carrying some of the largest discrepancies by state. D.C., with a black population of nearly 50 percent, had 88 percent of all police killings be against black Americans – a discrepancy of over 38 percentage points. Rhode Island had the largest discrepancy of 44 points, albeit with a much smaller sample size of four police killings in 2019 – two of them being African American. My article was not written in a vacuum. First, my article focused on nursing but made reference to the protests related to the death of George Floyd and recent protest. I did not attempt to debate policing in my article, but made an assumption that readers understand the data aforementioned that African Americans are killed by White police officers for nonviolent crimes disproportionately. Clearly, I overestimated based your response. Again, this article is based on nursing. You referred to safe neighborhoods. Public health and social determinants of health indicate that housing, access to food, safe neighborhoods, food deserts, education, healthcare access etc. are key indicators that impact health outcomes. Research on this issue is extensive. Here a brief article for your reference. https://www.focusforhealth.org/sdoh_neighborhood/ African American Males in Nursing You stated, If you took into account that African Americans are 14% of the population (7% African American Females), they would be over represented if you accounted for the complete lack of African American males in nursing." Statistically, you are incorrect. In a recent study by the American Association of the College of Nursing, African-Americans only made up six percent of the nursing workforce, and the figure is even less when looking at black males. The amount of white registered nurses is around 83 percent, significantly higher than that of minority groups. Here is additional information for your review about minorities in nursing. https://www.RN.com/nursing-news/diversity-in-nursing-male-nurses-and-minorities/ https://observer.case.edu/bennett-why-black-males-should-enter-nursing/
  14. Stacy Winters

    Racism and Covid-19: The Unmasking of Two Pandemics

    Thank you for reading.
  15. Stacy Winters

    Racism and Covid-19: The Unmasking of Two Pandemics

    Thank you for reading. I appreciate your kind stance toward your coworkers. You are the change. I appreciate you.
  16. Stacy Winters

    Racism and Covid-19: The Unmasking of Two Pandemics

    Thank you for your thoughtful post. I slightly disagree. What needs to happen is that People of Color need to be at all levels so that racism is less likely to occur. If we are not at the table, "we are on the menu." They, organizations and others, will not consider us at all. This article was written to provoke healthcare leaders to examine their leadership chain. Are they Blacks, Latinx, LGBTQ, etc persons considered for every position? If not, why? Recruitment and opportunities must be extended to everyone who is qualified not simply like those who look and speak like those in the establishment.
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